Secret In Being 117 Years Old

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Emma Morano, a 117 year old woman, believed that the secret behind her long life was eating three raw eggs daily and being alone most of her life.

I dug deep into her lifestyle. What I found will amaze you…

She had a positive attitude towards life, had devoted friends, faith and loved her pets.

If you haven’t heard, she died 2 months ago. She was the last living woman to be born in the 1800s.

Until she was 115, she did not have live-in caregivers. She cooked herself until she was 112 years old.

She usually cooked pasta and raw ground beef. But rarely ate vegetables and fruits!

Eggs, chicken, an ommellete, here and there, pasta and meat is what dominated her diet.

She lived a life of simplicity. Her apartment was clean and simple.

Gut instincts, faith and simple pleasures was all she truly followed. 

Those of you consumed by consumerism will have difficulty understanding Emma, you just have too many material things in your life.

Emma was too simple for you.

People think that dieting is a way to longevity, but she changed her diet only 1 year ago when she cut out her meat intake because someone told her it could lead to a tumor.

The reason why she lived a solitary life is that she was in love with a boy that died in WORLD WAR ONE, so she refused to be with anyone else afterwards.

What I like the most about her is that she refused to go to the hospital when she was ill.

A strong will to live, curiosity and an interest in the world around her were the fuel that drove her long and happy life.

A study done on 100 seniors averaging 81 years of age, showed that those who were exposed to positive words such as “creative” or “fit” where physically stronger while those exposed to negative words where physically weaker.

Most 100 year olds don’t feel old, they say they feel decades younger.

Real food plays into the equation.

Keeping it simple adds years onto the back of your life.

The second oldest person is a Jamaican woman that consumes only home-cooked staff such as fish, meat and vegetables.

In Japan, where many people live to be 100, they have an interesting practice called hara hachi bu, which means that they eat only until they are 80 percent full.

The quality and quantity of one’s social relationships Is not only linked to mental health, but also to morbidity and mortality.

A study done on 310,000 participants had proven this to be truth.

In fact, it found out that there is 50 percent likelihood of longer life by just having positive relationships.

Successful dealing with stress, being a hard worker and having goals in life is all it takes to ensure your life to be long living.

One such claim by Howard S. Friedman author of “The Longevity Project” states:

"Studies suggest that it is a society with more conscientious and goal-oriented citizens, well-integrated into their communities, that is likely to be important to health and long life. These changes involve slow, step-by-step alterations that unfold across many years. But so does health. For example, connecting with and helping others is more important than obsessing over a rigorous exercise program." (http://www.apa.org/monitor/2011/12/longer-life.aspx)


Volunteering on other hand yields mental health benefits to older people.

Being a Volunter gives you access to social and psychological resources, which counter negative moods such as depression and anxiety.

Analysis of data from the Americans Changing Lives data reveals that volunteering really does lower depression levels for those over 65 years old.

It is because it encourages the social integration that the secret lies into.

The ability to get along with people, spend time and live with is all it takes to successful aging.

Those who view their work as important are the ones that work past the “retirement” age.

These small things it what it takes, the will to live is all it can boil down to.

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